Bugs as Drugs Therapeutic Microbes for the Prevention and Treatment of Disease

Image of the book cover for 'Bugs as Drugs'
Author: Robert Britton, Patrice Cani
Affiliation:
Publisher: ASM Press
Publication Date: 2018
ISBN 10: 1555819699
ISBN 13: 9781555819699
eISBN: 9781555819705
Edition: 1st
Description:
Examining the enormous potential of microbiome manipulation to improve health Associations between the composition of the intestinal microbiome and many human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, and cancer, have been elegantly described in the past decade. Now, whole-genome sequencing, bioinformatics, and precision gene-editing techniques are being combined with centuries-old therapies, such as fecal microbiota transplantation, to translate current research into new diagnostics and therapeutics to treat complex diseases. Bugs as Drugs provides a much-needed overview of microbes in therapies and will serve as an excellent resource for scientists and clinicians as they carry out research and clinical studies on investigating the roles the microbiota plays in health and disease. In Bugs as Drugs, editors Robert A. Britton and Patrice D. Cani have assembled a fascinating collection of reviews that chart the history, current efforts, and future prospects of using microorganisms to fight disease and improve health. Sections cover traditional uses of probiotics, next-generation microbial therapeutics, controlling infectious diseases, and indirect strategies for manipulating the host microbiome. Topics presented include: - How well-established probiotics support and improve host health by improving the composition of the intestinal microbiota of the host and by modulating the host immune response. - The use of gene editing and recombinant DNA techniques to create tailored probiotics and to characterize next-generation beneficial microbes. For example, engineering that improves the anti- inflammatory profile of probiotics can reduce the number of colonic polyps formed, and lactobacilli can be transformed into targeted delivery systems carrying therapeutic proteins or bioengineered bacteriophage. - The association of specific microbiota composition with colorectal cancer, liver diseases,
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